Blow

used with courtesey of Daily Script – Movie Scripts and Movie Screenplays in proper screen writing format.


ON BLACK:


“A MAN MUST LOOK AT HIS LIFE AND THINK LUXURY.”


FADE IN:


EXT. GUARJIRA, COLOMBIA – 1989 – DAY


A majestic panorama of the lush green slopes that are the
Columbian highlands. A faint chopping sound IS HEARD and
then another. WHOOSH. WHOOSH. The view changes and tiny
dots appear on the hillside vegetation. WHOOSH.


CLOSER


We realize the dots are people. Workers swinging long steel
machetes in slow methodical rhythm. WHOOSH. WHOOSH. WE SEE
the South American Indian MEN clearly now. Their tar stained
teeth. Their gaunt faces riddled with crow’s feet. Their
jaws chewing away on huge wads of coca leaves as they collect
the harvest.


EXT. DIRT ROAD – COLOMBIA – DAY


Old rickety trucks carrying the huge green tractor-sized
bales speed along the narrow road.


EXT. CLEARING – COLOMBIA – DAY


The bundles are undone and Columbian women separate out the
leaves. Tribes of underweight workers carry armload after
armload of the harvest and ritualistically dump them into a
gigantic cannibal pot which sits on top of a raging bonfire.
The leaves are being boiled down and a huge plume of smoke
streaks the sky. Wizened Indios brave the heat and shovel
ashes into the pot to cool the solution.


INT. JUNGLE – COLOMBIA – DAY


A primitive but enormous makeshift lab contains all the
equipment. The machinery. The solutions. The over-sized
vats. Dark-skinned bandoleros smoke cigarettes and sport
automatic weapons at all the points of entry. The coca is
now a “basuco” paste and is being sent in for a wash.


INT. LABORATORY – COLOMBIA – 1989 – DAY


A conveyor belt pours out brick after brick of pure cocaine
hydrochloride. The bricks are wrapped, tied up, weighed, and
stamped with a “P” before being thrown into duffel bags.


EXT. JUNGLE AIRSTRIP – COLOMBIA – DAY


A small twin-engine Cessna is loaded with dozens of duffel
bags and the plane takes off.


EXT. VERO BEACH AIRFIELD – NIGHT


The Cessna touches down.


EXT. WORKSITE – WEYMOUTH – 1966 – DAY


The worksite is busy. George is amongst other workers,
working a summer job. As George is taking five, he looks
across the sight to Fred, who is sweeping up debris. A long
way from being the boss.


INT. COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICE – WEYMOUTH – 1966 – DAY


George stands in line to register for college, wearing his
Brooks Brothers suit, bowtie, and freshly Bryllcreamed hair.
The room is crowded and the line is long. Bob Dylan’s
“Subterranean Homesick Blues” blares out of one of the kid’s
transistor radios. George looks around the room. He is
uncomfortable. He catches his reflection in the shiny glass
partition and stops. He doesn’t like what he sees.
Something is not right. He looks like everyone else. Same
cookie-cutter hair, same cookie-cutter clothes, same cookie
cutter faces. He’s a carbon copy.


REGISTRATION WOMAN
Next.


It’s George’s turn but he doesn’t hear it. “Twenty years of
schooling and they put you on a day shift.” The words hit
him like a tone of bricks as he continues to stare at his own
reflection.


GEORGE (V.O.)
I was standing there, and it was like
the outside of me and the inside of me
didn’t match, you know? And then I
looked around the room and it hit me. I
saw my whole life. Where I was gonna
live, what type of car I’d drive, who my
neighbors would be. I saw it all and I
didn’t want it. Not that life.


EXT. CONSTRUCTION SITE – WEYMOUTH – 1966 – DAY


George sits with Fred. It’s breaktime and Fred eats from a
lunch box.


GEORGE
There’s something out there for me, Dad.
Something different. Something free
form, you know? Something for me, and
college just isn’t it.


FRED
That’s too bad. You would have been the
first one in the family.


GEORGE
I know.


FRED
Alright. You want me to get your old
job back? Because I could, you know, I
could put in that word.


GEORGE
No, Dad. I don’t want to…I mean, I
just don’t want…


It’s obvious to Fred that his son doesn’t want to be like
him.


FRED
What are you going to do?


GEORGE
I’m going to California.


EXT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT – 1968 – DAY


SUPERIMPOSE: MANHATTAN BEACH, CALIFORNIA 1968


George and Tuna, now 21-years old, struggle with their bags.
Their new place is a tackily furnished, two-story apartment
with small balconies and a view of the ocean. As George and
Tuna struggle with the bags, two California beauties appear
on the balcony next door: BARBARA BUCKLEY, 20, and MARIA
GONZALES, 21.


GIRLS
You guys need some help?


George and Tuna share a look.


TUNA
I don’t know about you, but I think
we’re gonna like it here.


EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – DAY


SERIES OF SHOTS


Barbara and Maria introduce George and Tuna around to the
Manhattan Beach regulars. They are immediately accepted
despite their ill fitting shorts and Tuna’s unhip black
socks. The beach scene is one big party. Lots of beer,
music, bikinis, and good times. By the end of the day,
George and Tuna have a hundred new friends.


GEORGE (V.O.)
California was like nothing I’d ever
experienced. The people were liberated
and independent and full of new ideas.


GEORGE (V.O.) (CONT’D)
They used words like “right on,”
“groovy,” and “solid.” The women are
all beautiful and seemed to share the
same occupation.


WOMAN #1
I’m a flight attendant.


WOMAN #2
I’m a flight attendant.


WOMAN #3
I’m a flight attendant.


The weed comes out and is passed around. Pipes. Joints.
Bongs. In SLOW MOTION, Barbara takes a huge hit of grass,
grabs George’s face, french kissing him, and giving him a
huge shotgun.


INT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT – 1968 – DAY


George and Barbara are sleeping late. Their bodies
intertwined beneath the sheets. A slam of the front door
wakes them up. It’s Tuna.


TUNA
Hey, wake up. Come on, you two
lovebirds. Hurry, I want to show you
something.


George and Barbara shake cobwebs out and stumble into the
kitchen to find Tuna holding a brown paper shopping bag.


TUNA (CONT’D)
Figured it out.


GEORGE
Figured what out?


TUNA
You know how we were wondering what we
were going to do for money? Being how
we don’t want to get jobs and whatnot?
Well, check this out.


Tuna takes the paper bag and empties its contents on the
kitchen table. It’s a grey mound of stocky, seedy marijuana.


Barbara examines the reefer.


BARBARA
Tuna, this is crap.


TUNA
I know it’s not the greatest. It’s
commercial.


BARBARA
It’s garbage.


GEORGE
It’s oregano. You got ripped off, pal.
What are you gonna do with all this?


TUNA
We sell it. I got it all figured out.
We make three finger lids and sell them
on the beach. We move all of it. We’ve
made ourselves a hundred bucks. Or a
lot of weed for our head. What do you
think? Not bad, huh? I got the baggies
and everything.


BARBARA
You can’t sell this to your friends.


TUNA
Man. Fuck you guys. I have this great
idea and you guys have to be all
skeptical.


BARBARA
Look, if you really wanna score some
dope, I got the guy.


EXT. THE WHIPPING POST – MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – DAY


George, Barbara and Tuna stop outside the front door.


GEORGE
Are you sure this guy is cool?


BARBARA
You’ll see for yourself.


TUNA
A beauty parlor for men? Sounds pretty
queer.


They walk in.


INT. THE WHIPPING POST – MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – CONTINUOUS


George, Tuna and Barbara enter. The Whipping Post is
California’s first male hair salon. George looks around at
the customer’s being pampered. Haircuts, pedicures,
manicures.


GEORGE
Nothing like this back home.


BARBARA
Derek!


DEREK FOREAL is a curious man. Daringly effeminate,
especially for the sixties, he is always surrounded by
beautiful women. As he sees Barbara, he stops his haircut
and runs to embrace her.


DEREK
Barbie!


Derek’s female entourage rush over as well. Kisses all
around.


DEREK (CONT’D)
So, this is the new man, huh? He’s
cute!


George and Tuna stick out there hands.


GEORGE
George.


TUNA
Tuna.


DEREK
Tuna, oh my. Enchante, George. Barbie,
he’s yummy. He looks like a Ken doll.
Oooh, Ken and Barbie. It’s perfect.
Alright, girls, give me five minutes.


Derek makes dismissing gestures and the girls scatter.


DEREK (CONT’D)
Everyone, shoo! You, too, Barbie. I
want to talk to the boys alone.


After the girls leave, Derek closes the partition and his
playful demeanor changes. He’s all business now.


DEREK (CONT’D)
What can I do for you guys?


GEORGE
We want some grass.


DEREK
I know what you want. But, first of
all, are you cops?


GEORGE
No.


DEREK
Because if you are, you have to tell me.
If not, it’s entrapment.


GEORGE
We’re not cops. We’re from
Massachusettes. I mean, does he look
like a cop?


DEREK
I guess not. Okay. You know, you’re
very lucky you’re friends of Barbie’s.
If you weren’t, I’d never talk to you.


Derek pulls a television-sized brick of quality marijuana out
from under a sink and sets it down in front of George.


GEORGE
What the fuck is that?


DEREK
It’s your grass.


TUNA
Wow. That’s more than we had in mind.


DEREK
I don’t nickel and dime. You want it or
not?


George and Tuna look at each other.


GEORGE
We’ll take it.


EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – DAY


SERIES OF SHOTS


Summer on the beach. It’s one big party. George and Tuna
are on the beach. They are the new kings. They smoke pot
and drink brews.
George and Barbara get close as do Tuna and Maria. Slowly,
George’s clothes and hair start to look better, cooler.


George and Tuna hanging out with the SURFERS.


George and Tuna hang with Barbara, Maria and SOME GIRLFRIENDS
in bikinis.


George and Barbara hang together at the life guard stand.


George and Tuna on the strand with HIPPY PROFESSORS selling
half-ounces.


Derek, Tuna, George, Barbara, Maria and the Elves play
volleyball.


Barbecue at Belmont Shores apartment with George, Barbara,
Derek, Tuna, Maria and different Elves.


George and Tuna sell half-ounces to BIKERS.


Derek is having a party out of a mini-van in the beach
parking lot. George, Barbara, Tuna and Maria are there.


EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – SUNSET


George and Barbara sit by the water, watching the waves crash
into the sand. The sky is streaked with purple and red.


GEORGE
This is it for me.


BARBARA
What is?


GEORGE
Just everything. You. California. The
beach. This spot right here. I feel
like I belong here, you know? It just
feels right.


BARBARA
You happy, baby?


GEORGE
Yeah. I am.


EXT. WORKSITE – WEYMOUTH – 1966 – DAY


The worksite is busy. George is amongst other workers,
working a summer job. As George is taking five, he looks
across the sight to Fred, who is sweeping up debris. A long
way from being the boss.


INT. COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICE – WEYMOUTH – 1966 – DAY


George stands in line to register for college, wearing his
Brooks Brothers suit, bowtie, and freshly Bryllcreamed hair.
The room is crowded and the line is long. Bob Dylan’s
“Subterranean Homesick Blues” blares out of one of the kid’s
transistor radios. George looks around the room. He is
uncomfortable. He catches his reflection in the shiny glass
partition and stops. He doesn’t like what he sees.
Something is not right. He looks like everyone else. Same
cookie-cutter hair, same cookie-cutter clothes, same cookie
cutter faces. He’s a carbon copy.


REGISTRATION WOMAN
Next.


It’s George’s turn but he doesn’t hear it. “Twenty years of
schooling and they put you on a day shift.” The words hit
him like a tone of bricks as he continues to stare at his own
reflection.


GEORGE (V.O.)
I was standing there, and it was like
the outside of me and the inside of me
didn’t match, you know? And then I
looked around the room and it hit me. I
saw my whole life. Where I was gonna
live, what type of car I’d drive, who my
neighbors would be. I saw it all and I
didn’t want it. Not that life.


EXT. CONSTRUCTION SITE – WEYMOUTH – 1966 – DAY


George sits with Fred. It’s breaktime and Fred eats from a
lunch box.


GEORGE
There’s something out there for me, Dad.
Something different. Something free
form, you know? Something for me, and
college just isn’t it.


FRED
That’s too bad. You would have been the
first one in the family.


GEORGE
I know.


FRED
Alright. You want me to get your old
job back? Because I could, you know, I
could put in that word.


GEORGE
No, Dad. I don’t want to…I mean, I
just don’t want…


It’s obvious to Fred that his son doesn’t want to be like
him.


FRED
What are you going to do?


GEORGE
I’m going to California.


EXT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT – 1968 – DAY


SUPERIMPOSE: MANHATTAN BEACH, CALIFORNIA 1968


George and Tuna, now 21-years old, struggle with their bags.
Their new place is a tackily furnished, two-story apartment
with small balconies and a view of the ocean. As George and
Tuna struggle with the bags, two California beauties appear
on the balcony next door: BARBARA BUCKLEY, 20, and MARIA
GONZALES, 21.


GIRLS
You guys need some help?


George and Tuna share a look.


TUNA
I don’t know about you, but I think
we’re gonna like it here.


EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – DAY


SERIES OF SHOTS


Barbara and Maria introduce George and Tuna around to the
Manhattan Beach regulars. They are immediately accepted
despite their ill fitting shorts and Tuna’s unhip black
socks. The beach scene is one big party. Lots of beer,
music, bikinis, and good times. By the end of the day,
George and Tuna have a hundred new friends.


GEORGE (V.O.)
California was like nothing I’d ever
experienced. The people were liberated
and independent and full of new ideas.


GEORGE (V.O.) (CONT’D)
They used words like “right on,”
“groovy,” and “solid.” The women are
all beautiful and seemed to share the
same occupation.


WOMAN #1
I’m a flight attendant.


WOMAN #2
I’m a flight attendant.


WOMAN #3
I’m a flight attendant.


The weed comes out and is passed around. Pipes. Joints.
Bongs. In SLOW MOTION, Barbara takes a huge hit of grass,
grabs George’s face, french kissing him, and giving him a
huge shotgun.


INT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT – 1968 – DAY


George and Barbara are sleeping late. Their bodies
intertwined beneath the sheets. A slam of the front door
wakes them up. It’s Tuna.


TUNA
Hey, wake up. Come on, you two
lovebirds. Hurry, I want to show you
something.


George and Barbara shake cobwebs out and stumble into the
kitchen to find Tuna holding a brown paper shopping bag.


TUNA (CONT’D)
Figured it out.


GEORGE
Figured what out?


TUNA
You know how we were wondering what we
were going to do for money? Being how
we don’t want to get jobs and whatnot?
Well, check this out.


Tuna takes the paper bag and empties its contents on the
kitchen table. It’s a grey mound of stocky, seedy marijuana.


Barbara examines the reefer.


BARBARA
Tuna, this is crap.


TUNA
I know it’s not the greatest. It’s
commercial.


BARBARA
It’s garbage.


GEORGE
It’s oregano. You got ripped off, pal.
What are you gonna do with all this?


TUNA
We sell it. I got it all figured out.
We make three finger lids and sell them
on the beach. We move all of it. We’ve
made ourselves a hundred bucks. Or a
lot of weed for our head. What do you
think? Not bad, huh? I got the baggies
and everything.


BARBARA
You can’t sell this to your friends.


TUNA
Man. Fuck you guys. I have this great
idea and you guys have to be all
skeptical.


BARBARA
Look, if you really wanna score some
dope, I got the guy.


EXT. THE WHIPPING POST – MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – DAY


George, Barbara and Tuna stop outside the front door.


GEORGE
Are you sure this guy is cool?


BARBARA
You’ll see for yourself.


TUNA
A beauty parlor for men? Sounds pretty
queer.


They walk in.


INT. THE WHIPPING POST – MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – CONTINUOUS


George, Tuna and Barbara enter. The Whipping Post is
California’s first male hair salon. George looks around at
the customer’s being pampered. Haircuts, pedicures,
manicures.


GEORGE
Nothing like this back home.


BARBARA
Derek!


DEREK FOREAL is a curious man. Daringly effeminate,
especially for the sixties, he is always surrounded by
beautiful women. As he sees Barbara, he stops his haircut
and runs to embrace her.


DEREK
Barbie!


Derek’s female entourage rush over as well. Kisses all
around.


DEREK (CONT’D)
So, this is the new man, huh? He’s
cute!


George and Tuna stick out there hands.


GEORGE
George.


TUNA
Tuna.


DEREK
Tuna, oh my. Enchante, George. Barbie,
he’s yummy. He looks like a Ken doll.
Oooh, Ken and Barbie. It’s perfect.
Alright, girls, give me five minutes.


Derek makes dismissing gestures and the girls scatter.


DEREK (CONT’D)
Everyone, shoo! You, too, Barbie. I
want to talk to the boys alone.


After the girls leave, Derek closes the partition and his
playful demeanor changes. He’s all business now.


DEREK (CONT’D)
What can I do for you guys?


GEORGE
We want some grass.


DEREK
I know what you want. But, first of
all, are you cops?


GEORGE
No.


DEREK
Because if you are, you have to tell me.
If not, it’s entrapment.


GEORGE
We’re not cops. We’re from
Massachusettes. I mean, does he look
like a cop?


DEREK
I guess not. Okay. You know, you’re
very lucky you’re friends of Barbie’s.
If you weren’t, I’d never talk to you.


Derek pulls a television-sized brick of quality marijuana out
from under a sink and sets it down in front of George.


GEORGE
What the fuck is that?


DEREK
It’s your grass.


TUNA
Wow. That’s more than we had in mind.


DEREK
I don’t nickel and dime. You want it or
not?


George and Tuna look at each other.


GEORGE
We’ll take it.


EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – DAY


SERIES OF SHOTS


Summer on the beach. It’s one big party. George and Tuna
are on the beach. They are the new kings. They smoke pot
and drink brews.
George and Barbara get close as do Tuna and Maria. Slowly,
George’s clothes and hair start to look better, cooler.


George and Tuna hanging out with the SURFERS.


George and Tuna hang with Barbara, Maria and SOME GIRLFRIENDS
in bikinis.


George and Barbara hang together at the life guard stand.


George and Tuna on the strand with HIPPY PROFESSORS selling
half-ounces.


Derek, Tuna, George, Barbara, Maria and the Elves play
volleyball.


Barbecue at Belmont Shores apartment with George, Barbara,
Derek, Tuna, Maria and different Elves.


George and Tuna sell half-ounces to BIKERS.


Derek is having a party out of a mini-van in the beach
parking lot. George, Barbara, Tuna and Maria are there.


EXT. MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – SUNSET


George and Barbara sit by the water, watching the waves crash
into the sand. The sky is streaked with purple and red.


GEORGE
This is it for me.


BARBARA
What is?


GEORGE
Just everything. You. California. The
beach. This spot right here. I feel
like I belong here, you know? It just
feels right.


BARBARA
You happy, baby?


GEORGE
Yeah. I am.


INT. BELMONT SHORES APARTMENT – 1968 – DAY


George walks in to find Tuna and Maria sitting with KEVIN
DULLI, an old friend from back east. He’s sitting in front
of a water pipe and coughing his ass off.


TUNA
Look what the cat dragged in.


GEORGE
Holy shit, Dulli. What the hell are you
doing here?


KEVIN
Well, I’ll tell you. I was walking down
the beach, minding my business, when who
did I see but this fucking guy. I
didn’t know you guys were living in
California.


GEORGE
Yeah, but what are you doing out here?


KEVIN
I’m on vacation. On my way back to
school.


GEORGE
This calls for a joint. You want to do
the honors?


KEVIN
No, man. I’m too fucked up.


TUNA
Nice weed, huh?


KEVIN
Fuck yeah. I never seen nothing like
it. I’m fucking wasted.


GEORGE
Right on.


KEVIN
G-d, I’m stoned. I’m stoned. I’m
really…


GEORGE
Stoned?


KEVIN
I wish there was shit like this back
home.


GEORGE
Yeah?


KEVIN
Shit, yeah. Do you know how much money
I could make if I had this stuff back
east?


TUNA
No shit, Kevin?


KEVIN
That’s right.


GEORGE
Yeah?


KEVIN
When there’s something to move, it’s too
easy not to. Do you know how many
colleges are in a twenty mile radius?
U. Mass, Amherst, B.U….


TUNA
Smith. Hampshire….


KEVIN
Right. And Holyoke. There are a
hundred thousand rich kids with their
parents’ money to spend, but there’s
never anything available. Nothing good,
anyway. I’m paying four hundred dollars
for shit.


INT. THE WHIPPING POST – MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – DAY


Derek, George and Barbara sit around. The blinds are drawn.


GEORGE
The way we figure it, Barbara flies to
Boston twice a week. Two bags per
flight. Twenty-five pounds in each bag.


DEREK
You’re kidding, right? That’s a hundred
pounds a week.


GEORGE
Yeah, I know, it’s a lot of weight.


BARBARA
We’re gonna call it California
sinsemilla. Sounds exotic.


GEORGE
I’m telling you, Derek, it will sell.


DEREK
I don’t know…


GEORGE
Here’s the best part. We can charge
five-hundred a pound.


DEREK
Come on, George, no one is going to pay
that.


GEORGE
It’s already been negotiated. It’s
done. The money is there waiting.


Derek looks at Barbara. She nods.


DEREK
Goodness.


GEORGE
Goodness is right. If you do the math,
that’s over thirty grand a week profit.
I want you to be my partner on this,
Derek. Fifty-fifty. That’s fifteen
thousand a week for you, my friend. In
your pocket, free and clear.


DEREK
And I only deal with you?


GEORGE
Barbara and me. No one else.


Derek thinks about it.


BARBARA
It’s gonna work, Derek.


DEREK
I don’t know. East coast. Airplanes.
It all sounds pretty risky.


GEORGE
She’s a flight attendant. They don’t
check her bags.


EXT. LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT – 1968 – DAY


George drops Barbara off in her uniform curbside. They kiss
and she walks away with two big, red Samsonites. She checks
them with a SKYCAP and tips him.


EXT. SKY – 1968 – DAY


A huge jet goes right to left through frame.


INT. LOGAN AIRPORT – GATE – BOSTON – 1968 – DAY


Barbara is greeted by KEVIN DULLI with a hug. A baggage
claim check is slipped into Kevin’s hand.


BARBARA
Any message?


KEVIN
Keep it coming.


INT. LOGAN AIRPORT – BAGGAGE CLAIM – BOSTON – 1968


We see Barbara’s two red Samsonites being taken off the belt
by Kevin.


INT. LOGAN AIRPORT – GATE – BOSTON – 1968


Same scene repeated, except different clothes on all. Maybe
Kevin is dressed a little better.


KEVIN
More.


INT. LOGAN AIRPORT – GATE – BOSTON – 1968


The same scene repeated, same things changed again; now Kevin
is definitely dressed a little better.


KEVIN
I need more.


BARBARA
What do you want me to do? I can only
take two bags, and I can’t fly back here
everyday.


KEVIN
I know, but I’ve got a feeding frenzy on
my hands. Tell George this is small
potatoes. We’re missing out on some
serious cash. You tell George. He’ll
think of something.


EXT. WINNEBAGO – 1968 – DAY


MUSIC CUE:


Tuna drives the big Winny. Maria rides shotgun. Barrelling
cross-country, it’s a party on wheels.


EXT. WHITE OAK LODGE – AMHERST – 1968 – NIGHT


Kevin and his girl, RADA, are the welcoming committee as the
RV pulls into the parking lot. They wave, slap the sides of
the Winnebago, and greet the prodigal sons with hugs and
handshakes.


INT. WHITE OAK LODGE – AMHERST – 1968 – LATER


George’s room is rustic and plush. A log fire burns and
empty champagne bottles adorn the surroundings. The girls
have taken to each other. The music is loud, and they dance
while the boys do business. Kevin counts out the money.
It’s stacked in piles all over the table.


KEVIN
Twenty, forty, sixty, eighty, nine.
Twenty, forty, sixty, eighty, a
thousand. It’s all there. Wow. A
hundred and twenty-eight thousand
dollars.


TUNA
Jesus Christ, I’m getting a boner just
looking at it.


But George isn’t paying attention. His wheels are turning.


KEVIN
What’s the matter, George? Something
wrong? You look like you just fucked
your mother.


TUNA
Cheer up, man. Half this money is ours.
We’re fucking rich.


GEORGE
It’s not enough.


KEVIN
What?


TUNA
What the fuck are you talking about,
man?


GEORGE
The set-up is wrong. We’re doing all
the legwork, and at the end of the day,
we’re still paying retail. We’re
getting middled.


KEVIN
So?


GEORGE
So, we need to get to the source.


TUNA
Source? What about Derek?


GEORGE
He’s getting middled, too. And Derek’s
our partner. What’s good for us is good
for him.


KEVIN
Okay. So we need a source. Where do we
start?


GEORGE
Who speaks Spanish?


EXT. PUERTO VALLARTA – MEXICO – 1968 – DAY


MUSIC CUE.


SUPERIMPOSE: PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO


We PAN OFF the beautiful waters of Puerto Vallarta. This is
a local beach on a Saturday afternoon. The girls on the
beach are drinking coco-locos and swimming.


SERIES OF SHOTS – THE GANG LOOKING FOR A CONNECTION


George with a bartender.


Tuna and Dulli with cabbies.


George and Derek talking with a local man, RAMON, at a corner
bar.


Barbara, Maria and Rada talk with local girls.


EXT. OCEANA BAR – PUERTO VALLARTA – 1968 – DAY


TUNA
This is bullshit, George. We’re never
going to find anything down there.


KEVIN
You know, he’s got a point. We’re
fucking Americans. We stick out like
sore thumbs.


DEREK
I don’t think so.


GEORGE
You guys are such babies. You want to
go home, go. Me, I’m not going to stop
until I find the fucking motherlode.


RADA
Georgie, we’re gonna get busted if we
keep this up.


GEORGE
We’re not gonna get busted.


KEVIN
George, we’ll wind up in a Mexican
prison getting fucked up the ass by one
of Maria’s relatives.


MARIA
Hey, fuck you, Dulli. I’m not Mexican.
I’m Italian.


BARBARA
You’re Italian?


KEVIN
Yeah, right. Gonzales. What is that,
Sicilian?


TUNA
As far as I’m concerned, we’re on
fucking vacation.


He grabs Maria, runs and does a huge belly-flop into the
water. They all laugh.


SERIES OF SHOTS.


George and Barbara with local musicians on the beach.


George and Derek at a cab stand.


George talks with a bellboy in the lobby of a local hotel.


INT. COCOS FRIOS BAR – PUERTO VALLARTA – 1968 – DAY


George, Barbara, Tuna, Derek, Maria, Kevin, and Rada are at
the bar. Ramon comes up to George, they briefly discuss and
George follows him out of the bar.


EXT. STREETS – PUERTO VALLARTA – 1968 – DAY


George and Ramon climb into a beat up V.W. bug and take off.


EXT. COUNTRYSIDE – PUERTO VALLARTA – 1968 – DAY


Fields and Farms. The V.W. bug pulls up to an old ranch.
They get out of the bug and are greeted by SANTIAGO and his
THREE SONS.


SANTIAGO
Ramon tells me you are looking for some
mota.


GEORGE
Yes, I am.


Santiago moves to a tarp and pulls it back to reveal many
bales of green, seedless sinsemilla.


SANTIAGO
For instance, something like this?


GEORGE
Very nice. I’ll take it.


SANTIAGO
Ha ha ha. You are funny. Really, how
much will you be needing?


GEORGE
All of it. As much as you’ve got. A
couples thousand pounds. I’ll be back
in a week with a plane.


SANTIAGO
Listen, Americano, it is very nice to
meet you, but maybe we are going too
fast. You take a little and then come
back.


GEORGE
I don’t need a little. I need a lot.


SANTIAGO
Marijuana is illegal in my country, and
I believe in yours, as well. We must be
careful.


GEORGE
What if I brought you, let’s say, fifty
thousand dollars? Would that eliminate
some of your concerns?


SANTIAGO
Amigo, you bring me fifty-thousand
dollars, and I have no more concerns.


EXT. SANTA MONICA AIRPORT – 1968 – DAY


A pair of boltcutters snaps the chain off a single-engine
Cessna.


TUNA
I can’t believe we’re stealing a plane.


KEVIN
Don’t be such a pussy.


GEORGE
It’s fine. We’re not stealing it.
We’re borrowing it. And try to look
natural. We’ve got company.


A MECHANIC working on the adjacent plane is giving them the
hairy eyeball.


GEORGE (CONT’D)
Be cool.


The three boys nod their heads in acknowledgement and give a
small wave. The mechanic smiles and waves back.


INT. CESSNA – 1968 – DAY


The engine is on and the propeller is spinning. Kevin is at
the controls. Tuna is not making the trip. He pokes his
head in before shutting the cockpit.


TUNA
You guys are fucking insane.


George reads from a flight manual.


GEORGE
Alright, pull back the throttle…


The engine screams.


GEORGE (CONT’D)
Not that far, only halfway. You sure
you know what you’re doing?


KEVIN
Relax. I’ve flown with my old man a
million times. And he always told me,
the taking off part is easy, it’s the
landing you’ve got to worry about.


EXT. SANTIAGO FARM – MEXICO – 1968 – DAY


The plane tries to land. It’s a clumsy one. The Cessna is
tipping and touching, first one wheel, then another, almost

sideways before straightening out and stopping. George and
Kevin hop out of the plane. They are greeted by Santiago and
the Mexican contingency.


AMIGOS
Hola, George! Bienvenido!


George hands out presents to everyone. He’s like Santa
Claus, giving gifts to every man, woman and child. They love
him. Santiago pumps George’s hand.


SANTIAGO
Good to see you, Jorge. You are a man
of your word.


GEORGE
Actually, I’ve got some news. That
fifty thousand I promised you, I
couldn’t get it.


George throws Santiago a duffel bag.


GEORGE (CONT’D)
So I brought you sixty.


EXT. DRY LAKE BEDS – TWENTY-NINE PALMS, CA. – 1968 – DUSK


Rada sits in the Winnebago and keeps flashing the headlights.
Barbara, Tuna, and Maria stand on top of the Winnebago waving
big, white towels. The plane descends from the sky and
touches down, making another extremely shaky landing.


INT. FOREAL’S HOUSE – MANHATTAN BEACH – 1968 – NIGHT


It’s on the water and beautiful. The furnishings are
distinctly Derek Foreal. It’s a surreal scene.
The holiday decorations are up, TOPLESS WOMEN in elf outfits
sip champagne, and a thousand pounds of cannabis lays on the
living room floor.


GEORGE
Are you sure you want to do this in
front of everyone?


DEREK
Don’t be ridiculous, these are my
babies.


George empties the pot all over the floor.


DEREK (CONT’D)
George, you’re a genius. We’re rich.
Come, children.


The girls dive on top of Derek, caressing and kissing him.


DEREK (CONT’D)
George, get my camera.


Derek poses with a load of marijuana like it’s a new fur.


DEREK (CONT’D)
Take a picture of me, George. Take a
picture of me with my new friends.
It’ll be a fabulous Christmas card.


INT. VILLA – PUERTO VALLARATA – 1970 – DAY


A Mexican Real Estate Agent shows Barbara and George a
sprawling Villa in Puerto Vallarta. It’s amazing. White
marble on the water. George looks at Barbara.


GEORGE
Should we buy it?


BARBARA
Are you kidding?


GEORGE
We’ll take it.


EXT. VILLA – PUERTO VALLARATA – 1970 – MAGIC HOUR


The team is there. All of them. George, Barbara, Kevin,
Rada, Tuna, Maria and Derek with a couple of new senorita
friends. They all wear identical Mexican sombreros. A
MEXICAN BOY approaches them with a camera.


MEXICAN BOY
Picture?


They pose, their arms thrown around each other in
camaraderie, and FLASH. The picture freezes and WE DISSOLVE.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Leave the field below empty!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.